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dc.contributor.advisorPickering, Martin
dc.contributor.authorMelissa, Cotter
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-28T13:28:45Z
dc.date.available2014-03-28T13:28:45Z
dc.date.issued2013-07-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/8678
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has shown that co-participating in tasks can inhibit individual performance as individuals align to one another’s goals. The present study investigated whether the same effect could be replicated when participants were unable to see one another, therefore relying on the belief the other participant was also completing the task. The study also aimed to test whether performing a task individually, but with the knowledge another participant had completed the task before or after, would have any effect on whether the participant would perceive the task to be individual or joint. A picture pair naming task was designed in which participants named picture pairs which were coloured green and red. Participants named both pictures and were instructed before each picture pair as to which picture they were to name first. Participants could also see their co-actors instructions which were either the same (named the pictures in the same order) different (participants named pictures in the opposite order to one another) or singular (only one participant named the pictures). There was no effect on naming together or individually in either the simultaneous or individual task. However, mean differences between conditions seemed to suggest that there was some difference between the two groups’ perception of the task as individual and joint. There was less clear-cut evidence when comparing participants performing simultaneously and performing it individually. A subject analyses found no effect between the simultaneous or individual groups. However, an item analysis did find an effect between the two groups with simultaneous participants being more inhibited. Although the evidence is not overly clear there seems to be an implication there is some effect and that through manipulating the environment in future studies, so that participants have a stronger sense of ‘closeness’ between one another, these effects may be more evident.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen_US
dc.subjectcooperative participationen_US
dc.subjectbeliefen_US
dc.titleSocial inhibition of picture naming task: The effects of concurrent compared to consecutive naming when acting on belief of cooperative participationen_US
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelUndergraduateen_US
dc.type.qualificationnameUndergraduateen_US
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


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