Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSweeney, Alison
dc.contributor.authorJiggins, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorJohnsen, Sönke
dc.coverage.spatial2en
dc.date.accessioned2005-02-09T17:42:05Z
dc.date.available2005-02-09T17:42:05Z
dc.date.issued2003-05-01
dc.identifier.citationSweeney A, Jiggins C, Johnsen S, NATURE, 423 (6935): 31-32 MAY 1 2003en
dc.identifier.uriwww.nature.com/nature
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/697
dc.description.abstractIridescent butterfly scales are visually stunning structures that reflect highly saturated colour. They also create an array of non-chromatic optical phenomena, such as polarization, polarization mixing and highly directional flashes (1,2) but the ecological purpose of these effects is unclear (3,4). Here we show that polarized light is used in mate recognition by Heliconius butterflies, a genus that is known to rely on visual cues in sexual selection and speciation (5). This terrestrial example of exploitation of polarized light may have adaptive value in dense forest, where illumination varies greatly in spectrum and intensity.en
dc.format.extent105424 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.subjectPolarised lighten
dc.subjectbutterflyen
dc.subjectmating signalen
dc.titleBrief Communication: Polarized light as a butterfly mating signalen
dc.typeArticleen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record