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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/6054

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Ma Hiu Laam Dissertation 2011.doc111 kBMicrosoft Word
Title: The Relations among Authenticity, Culture, and the Perception of Self
Authors: Ma, Hiu Laam
Supervisor(s): Lenton, Alison
Issue Date: Jun-2011
Publisher: The University of Edinburgh
Abstract: Abstract This article reports the relationship between authenticity, culture and how they affect the psychological perception of self. Authenticity is the sense of being true to oneself; it is referring to something real, pure and origin. Previous researches have demonstrated a significant association between authenticity and other psychological aspects, however, cross culture variable was seldom take into account. In the current study, 436 respondents (Mean age = 28.3, SD = 9.1) from different countries completed a survey which include number of scales to measure participants’ individual different and the sense of authenticity. After completing the scales, participants would be asked to write a narrative which they feel to be either authentic or inauthentic (plus a control condition). In followed, different scales were adapted to examined participants’ particular feelings about the events they described. Across our findings, authenticity was significantly different between cultures. Authenticity was associated with numbers of psychological perception of self which in line with previous research. The results also indicate few psychological aspects were significant different between cultures. However, we have not found a significant relationship of authenticity and the perception of self in regards to culture.
Keywords: authenticity
culture
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/6054
Appears in Collections:Psychology Undergraduate thesis collection

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