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dc.contributor.advisorShillcock, Richard
dc.contributor.authorWu, Yu-Chieh
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-07T14:47:36Z
dc.date.available2011-09-07T14:47:36Z
dc.date.issued2010-11-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/5330
dc.description.abstractAbstract The experiment compared stereoacuity with Chinese characters when they appeared at different visual field, depth, and time duration. Character in front of the horopter was presented in LoVF, which induces crossed retinal disparities (CRD). In contrast, character behind the horopter was presented in UVF, which induces uncrossed retinal disparities (URD). The results showed that males were superior to the information presented on the UVF, while females did not show significant bias. Moreover, males were more sensitive to the size constancy illusion in which a far thing appears larger (e.g., character behind the horopter) under short and long timescales, while females were sensitive to character in front of the horopter under long timescales. The results supported earlier claims that female brains were less lateralized than male brains, and two genders showed different strategies in processing the stereoscopic stimuli.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectlower visual fielden
dc.subjectupper visual fielden
dc.titlestereoacuity in processing near and far stimulien
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMastersen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc Master of Scienceen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


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