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dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, John
dc.contributor.advisorMolloy, Seán
dc.contributor.authorWard, Matthew R.
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-13T14:55:38Z
dc.date.available2010-12-13T14:55:38Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/4456
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the theory and practice of humanitarian intervention in the early post-Cold War era. Taking as its basis US policy towards Somalia, Rwanda and Haiti between 1992 and 1994, it develops a theory of humanitarian intervention based on constructivist and scientific realist principles. Using identity as the organising concept, the thesis examines the meta-theoretical precepts of constructivism and scientific realism, which are developed into a methodology for analysing questions of foreign policy. Incorporating critical insights from sequential path analysis, morphogenetic social analysis - the notion of a dynamic mutual constitution of structure and agency - and constructivist social theory, the case studies provide a useful new means of conceptualising humanitarian intervention as a foreign policy practice through an identity-driven analysis. The findings of the research shed much light on this practice and its future prospects. They also suggest new directions for a scientific realist/constructivist research agenda.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectscientific realismen
dc.subjectconstructivismen
dc.subjectforeign policyen
dc.subjectidentityen
dc.subjecthumanitarian interventionen
dc.titleIdentity in crisis : the politics of humanitarian interventionen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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