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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/3755

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Title: A Comparison of Methods Used to Assess Access to Alcohol Outlets Associated with Social Deprivation: A Study in Edinburgh
Authors: Sharples, Lauren Elizabeth
Supervisor(s): Pearce, Jamie
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2010
Publisher: The University of Edinburgh
Abstract: Aims: The aim of this study was to assess five access methods, whilst examining access to alcohol outlets associated with social deprivation in Edinburgh. Methods: Alcohol outlets were mapped and five well used methods; density ratios, kernel density estimation, distance to nearest outlet, circular buffers and network buffers, were used to calculate access to alcohol outlets across quintiles of deprivation. Results: The two most appropriate methods for assessing access to alcohol outlets associated with social deprivation in Edinburgh are areal density and network buffers. The access to alcohol outlets across Edinburgh does vary by deprivation but not systematically. Conclusions: Depending on the circumstances of the study, the most appropriate method may vary. This study found a mixed picture related to access to alcohol outlets, and to further this research both demand and consumption rates is required.
Keywords: Alcohol Access
Social Deprivation
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/3755
Appears in Collections:MSc Geographical Information Science thesis collection

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