Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHewitt, Heather
dc.contributor.authorHui, Kin Lam
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-10T14:20:23Z
dc.date.available2010-08-10T14:20:23Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/3631
dc.description.abstractThe globalization of higher education has been greatly accelerated in the 21st century. International student recruitment not only enriches cultural diversity but also provides huge revenue to education providers. This study is a written discourse analysis of the introductory pages of university prospectuses in the two culturally distinct institutional contexts of Hong Kong and the United Kingdom. Applying Bhatia’s (1993) model of applied genre analysis, a five-move generic structure has been identified in 14 selected introductory pages which display evidence of interdiscursivity “with elements of advertising and other promotional genres” (Fairclough, 1993: 146). The introductory pages are established as a hybrid promotional genre sharing a recognisable set of three communicative purposes: persuading, welcoming and informing. Halliday’s (1994) functional grammar approach is adopted to closely examine how the introductory pages represent the experimental and interpersonal metafunctions of language by analysing the grammar of clauses (with a focus on transitivity) and allocation of social roles (with a focus on personal pronouns). Although there are variations shown in move structures, promotional strategies and linguistic and multimodal resources, both Hong Kong and British universities tend to maintain a common institutional role and most irregularities are due to “organisational differences” (Bhatia, 1999: 27). Individual universities push out the generic boundaries to fulfil private intentions so as to stand out from their regional or international counterparts. It is hoped that the recommendations for writing prospectuses can be applied effectively and extended to other related advertising genres to help universities and international educational organisation produce better promotional texts which target their intended audience.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectCritical Discourse Analysisen
dc.subjectGenre Analysisen
dc.subjectFunctional Grammaren
dc.subjectIntertextualityen
dc.subjectInterdiscursivityen
dc.subjectHigher Educationen
dc.subjectUniversity Prospectusesen
dc.titleHigher Education in a Globalised Market: A Comparative Discourse Study of University Prospectuses in Hong Kong and the United Kingdomen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.relation.referencesFairclough, N. (1993). Critical discourse analysis and the marketisation of public discourse: the universities. Discourse and Society, 4(2), 133-168.en
dc.relation.referencesBhatia, V. K. (1993). Analysing genre: language use in professional settings. London: Longman.en
dc.relation.referencesHalliday, M.A.K. (1994). An introduction to functional grammar (2nd ed.). London: Edward Arnold.en
dc.type.qualificationlevelMastersen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc Master of Scienceen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record