Information Services banner Edinburgh Research Archive The University of Edinburgh crest

Edinburgh Research Archive >
Social and Political Sciences, School of  >
Social Policy  >
Reconciliation of Work and Welfare in Europe working paper series >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/3142

This item has been viewed 128 times in the last year. View Statistics

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
REC-WP_0109_Viebrock_Clasen.pdf617.17 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Flexicurity – a state-of-the art review
Authors: Viebrock, Elke
Clasen, Jochen
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: The University of Edinburgh
Series/Report no.: REC-WP
01 / 09
Abstract: The notion of ‘flexicurity’ promises to overcome the tensions between labour market flexibility on the one hand and social security on the other hand by offering ‘the best of both worlds’. In this review the development of the concept will be set against the background of changed economic circumstances in the last two decades. The principal components of flexicurity are presented, followed by a review of ‘real worlds of flexicurity’ in selected European countries, with Denmark and the Netherlands as the most prominent examples. The subsequent section considers the transferability of flexicurity policies across borders. Finally, we concentrate on collective actors involved in promoting the idea of flexicurity and conclude with a discussion of some tensions within and criticisms of the concept.
Description: The Working Papers on the Reconciliation of Work and Welfare in Europe are published online by the Publication, Dissemination and Dialogue Centre (PUDIAC) of RECWOWE.
Sponsor(s): European Commission Sixth Framework Programme
Keywords: Social Policy
Labour Market Policy
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/3142
Appears in Collections:Reconciliation of Work and Welfare in Europe working paper series

Items in ERA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! Unless explicitly stated otherwise, all material is copyright © The University of Edinburgh 2013, and/or the original authors. Privacy and Cookies Policy