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dc.contributor.authorWotherspoon, Peter C.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:50:30Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:50:30Z
dc.date.issued1953en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30949
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractTo have deserved the title, the "Discoverer of John Knox," would seem to he certain assurance of undying fame and regard, at least in Scotland, if not among all Protestants; and yet, the man who earned that title is little known in his native land and practically unknown in his native town of Duns. Not that his name has disappeared entirely, for "Thomas McCrie" may still be discovered in the footnotes of even recent historical works concerned with the Scottish Church, and his "Life of Knox," which was responsible for restoring the great Reformer to his rightful place among the greatly honoured and highly regarded of Scotia's sons, will, probably, always be recognised as a standard which later historians have only embellished. However, McCrie accomplished much more in life than the composition of his biography of Knox, and this thesis is an attempt to recover Dr. McCrie's works from the oblivion for which they seemed to be destined and to assess his Importance and determine his place among the Scottish Historians. At the same time, an effort has been made to sketch enough of his life so that his character and background may be understood, and also to make a study of his main contribution to Scottish Churchmanship, which was in the field of Church and State relations, an area which, more than any other, has been the field of conflict in the Scottish Church.en
dc.description.abstractAlthough a detailed review of any single work has not been presented, a study of all McCrie's works has been made in the course of the preparation of this thesis. It should be mentioned , too, that not one of them proved to be dull or uninteresting and their style was found to be unexpectedly modern. In fact, his historical works are as easily read as a good novel which one scarcely wishes to lay aside until one has finished reading it all. His support of the Presbyterian Church of Scotland, the Reformers, and the Covenanters, and his intense pride in and love of his native land, gratifying to anyone of Scottish descent and of Presbyterian conviction but his outspoken criticism of prelacy and his undisguised preference for Scotland and Scottish life above any other, may be aggravating to the Episcopalians, particularly to those "south of the Border," as it evidently was when his works were first penned.en
dc.description.abstractBesides McCrie's own works and other general works on Scottish Church History and on the development of the science of Historiography, a study has been made of the periodicals and reviews contemporary with McCrle, and the conclusion seems to be Justified that, though McCrie was, in some respects, a late historian of the "Enlightenment," he was much more, for Scotland at least, a precursor of the age of scientific Historiography which has always been recognised to have commenced with Ranke.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.titleThomas McCrie: churchman and historianen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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