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dc.contributor.authorWallace, Bruceen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:49:32Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:49:32Z
dc.date.issued1995en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30884
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe CD-ROM opens up the possibility of a new approach to religious learning which is particularly relevant to secular contexts. This thesis arises from the question of how a public education system may respond appropriately to the religious dimension of life in a plural society. Three main issues are considered: the nature of religious learning, the ethical legitimacy of its provision in a secular context, and the feasibility of using computers to assist in this learning. These issues are brought together in an experimental study conducted across nine local authority primary schools in one Region of Scotland.en
dc.description.abstractContemporary religious education in Scottish schools is set against its distinctive historical background. Principal arguments connected with its theory and practice are discussed, and a review is undertaken of what religion means today. The case for the primacy of religious studies in schools is rejected and religious learning, understood as world view formation, is proposed as both ethically acceptable and necessary for a fully developed secular education. The relevant legislation as well as data collected from the study both advance the argument that non-denominational does not equate easily with religious, and might more appropriately be considered secular. It is in this context of uncertainty about religious matters that the power of the interactive CD-ROM has a special place.en
dc.description.abstractAn original paradigm for world view analysis is proposed and discussed. From this paradigm is derived a personal profiling instrument which is used to map the world views of a normal sample of 808 children in the 9-12 years age range. These personal world views are seen to have no statistically significant association with the subjects' experiences of religion and attitudes to it. At the same time as generally valuing moral behaviour, subjects appear to value religion less the more they know about it. As might be expected, girls are seen to value caring more than justice, and boys justice more than caring. Girls, however, also value justice more than boys.en
dc.description.abstractThe paradigm also generated the conceptual framework for the CD-ROM whose development is described and trial evaluated. Little doubt remains about the feasibility of an interactive programme to aid religious learning, but its effectiveness is not fully established in this study; several contributory factors external to the CD-ROM are identified. Those taking part in the trial amplified the effect already identified of simultaneously knowing more and caring less about religion. This result reinforces doubts about the current focus on religious traditions in the school's religious and moral education curriculum. The thesis is thought to have been satisfied in all essentials, and the need to review the direction now being taken in non-denominational religious and moral education is the main conclusion drawn.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.titleComputer aided religious learning in a secular contexten
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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