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dc.contributor.authorTitterton, Mike.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:49:07Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:49:07Z
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30845
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractSYNOPSIS: The research publications of the author have as their focus a coherent concern with risk behaviours and the management of the personal and social problems underpinning these forms of behaviour, including policy responses within the changing context of welfare. This has formed the common core of both his academic and professional research activities, and is reflected in his research outputs.en
dc.description.abstractThese inter-related themes have formed key motifs in the author's work: vulnerability, risk and resilience in socially excluded groups and communities; social policy responses, including prevention strategies and forms of health and welfare provision; shifts in the context for welfare, especially in state-voluntary sector relations; and the development of conceptual and methodological approaches to improve our understanding of these problems and our responses to them, applicable in both UK and international settings.en
dc.description.abstractIn this critical review, he describes and explains the development of these motifs, illustrating how a consistent and focused body of knowledge has been assembled and articulated in his research publications. It is contended that this has influenced both theory and practice in social policy, particularly in relation to the fields of health promotion, health care and social work. This reflective account embraces theoretical themes, methodological approaches, empirical settings and applications, and impact and influence of the research.en
dc.description.abstractTHEORETICAL THEMES: In order to improve our understanding of these problems and responses to them, this research has entailed the development of conceptual approaches. This includes an interest with the construction of social problems such as "vulnerability" and "risk" among socially excluded groups and communities and the evolution of responses to these issues. In addition, a focus of critical attention is social explanation and particularly concepts of the "middle range", which include the management of personal welfare, risk, resilience and vulnerability. A key endeavour has been the development of intermediate concepts that allow for purchase on particular social issues, of the sort contained in the author's Risk, Resilience and Vulnerability Model.en
dc.description.abstractMETHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES: Emphasis is given to some of the methodological innovations that have been developed in the course of the author's research. In terms of qualitative techniques, he pioneered the development of the Facilitated Discussion Group Method. This approach allows for the facilitation of perspectives of vulnerable and excluded individuals, enabling them to discuss their issues, including risk behaviours. Participatory research approaches have also been developed, for example, among disadvantaged groups in the context of the UK and Eastern Europe.en
dc.description.abstractEMPIRICAL FOCUS: The empirical settings and applications of the research as contained in his publications are held up for consideration. The contention is that the application of middle range concepts, such as the management of personal welfare or risk, can be relevant whatever the context, though some tailoring in their application to specific circumstances may be required. Therefore his work has included a range of related empirical contexts and research populations, though there is a particular concern with disadvantaged groups and communities, in both UK and international contexts.en
dc.description.abstractIMPACT AND APPLICATIONS: A major achievement of this research and associated publications has been their impact on policy and practice in health and social services, as well as on theoretical and methodological development in the field of social science. This impact has occurred at three key levels - the theoretical, the methodological and the empirical. Numerous examples are provided, particularly of the impact of this research upon social policy organisations in relation to risk. International examples have also been included, touching on the author's work in Europe, especially Eastern Europe.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.titleRisk and vulnerability in socially excluded groups and communities: welfare issues and policy responsesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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