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dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Kathryn M.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:47:17Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:47:17Z
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30664
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Despite the prevalence of mental health problems in later life, older people markedly underutilise mental health services. A greater awareness of factors influencing older peoples' attitudes to mental illness may therefore improve recognition, presentation, and treatment of mental disorders in this population, and so enhance quality of life. This study explores older people's attitudes to mental illness within the context of ageing, and considers whether attitudes act as potential barriers to engagement in health-related behaviours, and lead to lower subjective well-being.en
dc.description.abstractDESIGN/METHOD: A combined qualitative and quantitative methodology was used. First, focus groups were undertaken to pilot the study questionnaire and explore the subject area. A crosssectional independent groups design was then employed to compare responses of clinical (i.e. current service users) and non-clinical participants on a self-report questionnaire assessing attitudes to mental illness and ageing. 74 completed questionnaires were received (24 clinical; 50 non-clinical).en
dc.description.abstractRESULTS: Similar to younger people, older people endorsed a range of positive and negative attitudes to mental illness. However, when attitudes to mental illness were considered within the context of ageing and experience a more complex pattern of results emerged. While negative attitudes to mental illness were associated with negative attitudes to ageing across the entire sample, clinical participants (and those with prior experience of mental illness) reported more positive attitudes to mental illness and more negative attitudes to ageing than non-clinical participants, for whom the reverse was true. Attitudes were also differentially related to outcomes. Thus, positive attitudes to ageing predicted stronger endorsement of health-related behaviours (F₍₂,₇₁₎ = 9.93, p < 0.001), while negative attitudes to ageing and mental illness predicted lower subjective well-being (F₍₄,₆₇₎ = 22.99, p < 0.001)en
dc.description.abstractCONCLUSIONS: Attitudes to mental illness and ageing may be linked and mediated by personal experience and capacity for psychological self-regulation in the face of age-associated adversity. As one potential cause of the under-use of mental health services by older people, attitudes to mental illness in later life should form the focus of targeted health education interventions designed to address ageist misconceptions and ensure that all older people are given the opportunity to receive care likely to improve their health and well-being.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.titleOlder peoples' attitudes to mental illnessen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameDClinPsychol Doctor of Clinical Psychologyen


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