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dc.contributor.authorJohns, James L.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:43:10Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:43:10Z
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30323
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis thesis seeks to address one question: What may be known about the early Jewish transmission of Psalm 16 and how may the early Jewish transmission of Psalm 16 help us understand its messianic usage in Acts 2:14-36 and 13:16-41? Chapter 1 provides an overview of Psalm 16's journey from Hebrew poetry to messianic proof text. By examining the transmission of psalmody in Second Temple Judaism, the two-way relationship between prophecy and psalmody is seen as influencing the appropriation of Psalm 16. The Hebrew Bible shows the Psalms becoming part of the post-exilic practice of inner-biblical exegesis. Psalms are appropriated eschatologically within prophetic texts. In the extrabiblical literature of Second Temple Judaism, the Psalms are gradually seen to have a distinctive function as prophetic proof texts. Chapter 2 finds that Psalm 16's significant literary features confirm its sharing in ancient Syro-Palestinian poetic traditions. The poet of Psalm 16 uses traditional material, literary motifs, and stylistic techniques common to other Northwest Semitic languages. Psalm 16 appears to employ a variegated, heterogenous language reflecting an early stage of Hebrew as evidenced by its relatively dense cluster of Israelite Hebrew features. The form of Psalm 16 is that of a Vertrauenspsalm, "psalm of confidence." The language of the psalmist intimately expresses confidence in YHWH's provision, even in the case of death. Chapter 3 argues that Psalm 16's structure clearly supports its classification as a psalm of confidence and emphasizes its major theme of trust in YHWH. No textual, linguistic, formal, or structural evidence suggests a composite Psalm. A working translation of Psalm 16 suggests that, for its readers, Psalm 16 sets up a tension which awaits resolution. Sourced in the claim of a Heilsorakel (to which we have no further access), and confirmed in ongoing communion with YHWH, the psalmist may affirm something which partly fits received views on human destiny but also transcends them. This resolution is only barely sketched at the outer edge of the Hebrew Bible, in resurrection and post¬ mortem distinction between the righteous and the wicked. Yet, the resolution of this tension is clearly seen in the subsequent interpretation of Psalm 16 in extrabiblical Judaism, in the developing apocalyptic eschatological and messianic views found in other writings of extrabiblical Judaism, and in the applied messianism of early Christianity. Chapter 4 argues that LXX Psalm 15 renders MT Psalm 16 with stereotypical equivalents and therefore, represents an appropriate translation of the figurative Semitic phrases as they are understood in the context of the Jewish thought world of its time. The LXX version represents an apocalyptic eschatological reading of MT Psalm 16 which is at least more explicit, and perhaps a significant movement beyond, its meaning in the context of the formation of the MT-150 Psalter. Thus, apocalyptic eschatological readings of immortality and resurrection can be seen to emerge conceptually from within MT Psalm 16. 4Q177 appropriates Psalm 16:3a in an essentially apocalyptic eschatological series of messianic observations on COT CHIX, "the latter days." Like in the messianic arguments of 4Q174 and 11Q13, 4Q177 uses Psalms as the basis for claiming that the Qumran community inherits the promises of the Davidic tradition. Chapter 5 concludes that in the speeches of Peter and Paul in Acts 2 and Acts 13, we find Luke's argument to be haggadic midrashic in style. Therein, LXX Psalm 15 is treated as a Davidic oracle and is used as an historicized proof text and as a tool to link together other prophetic texts. The evidence now shows that an apocalyptic eschatological orientation and interpretive methods practiced in protorabbinic and other Jewish groups are shared by those first appropriating LXX Psalm 15 in early Christian tradition. The appropriation of Psalm 16 in Luke-Acts arises from this context of an apocalyptic eschatological worldview within a Judaism that understands itself to be experiencing COT! mnx, awaiting the Davidic Messiah. In conclusion, the messianic appropriation of Psalm 16 in Luke-Acts exhibits a long exegetical history. Psalm 16's transmission history demonstrates that its appropriation in Luke-Acts should be considered as early and that it is not the result of exclusively Christian inspiration. Psalm 16 did not become messianic in early Christian tradition - it entered early Christian tradition as a Davidic messianic oracle. Further, Psalm 16's transmission history helps us to understand that only the appropriation of this oracle as a testimonium to the resurrection of Jesus the Nazorean was the result of early Christian inspiration.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.titleThe early Jewish transmission of Psalm 16: from psalm to messianic proof text in Luke-Actsen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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