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dc.contributor.authorSalim, Muhammad Saad Muhammaden
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T10:15:56Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T10:15:56Z
dc.date.issued1976en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29980
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis study is concerned with examining, investigating and assessing the nature and significance of the protest and resistance of both urban and rural Africans in Southern Ghana, or what used to be called the Gold Coast Colony, to the British colonial policy of Indirect Rule during the second quarter of this century.en
dc.description.abstractIt has been argued that there were various factors which frustrated and made it impossible to establish a successful system of Indirect Rule in the Gold Coast Colony, One such factor was that the Akan political system was characteristically democratic in theory and practice. By contrast, Indirect Rule was by nature authoritarian and autocratic. In short, the democratic Akan political system and the autocratic Indirect Rule system were contradictory and could not possibly co-exist.en
dc.description.abstractFurthermore, in their opposition to the Indirect Rule system, the African leadership maintained that the chiefs* rights of jurisdiction were inherent in them by virtue of the position to which they had been elected by their people and they denied that they were derived from or exercisable at the will of the Crown. They argued that the Gold Coast was not conquered or ceded and thus the British Crown could not claim sovereignty over the chiefs. The result was that British legislation in the Gold Coast avoided, until 19hh, any explicit commitment to the absolute sovereignty of the Crown.en
dc.description.abstractIn addition, Western education, Christianity, economic growth and the activities of the press, all tended to weaken the authority of the chiefs and consequently contributed to the failure of Indirect Rule. The educated Africans - used here loosely to refer to both the intelli¬ gentsia and the semi-educated "youngraen" - came out strongly against the Indirect Rule system because, in their opinion, it tended to turn the balance of political power in favour of the chiefa. The educated Africans could not accept this as they considered themselves, and not the chiefs, destined to the political leadership of the country.en
dc.description.abstractIt must be stressed, however, that the educated Africans were not against chieftaincy; their respect for the position of the chiefs as a representative of the stool was never in question. It was in fact very misleading in the Gold Coast to speak of "detribalised" or "de¬ nationalised* Africans. Indeed one reason why chieftaincy survived in Ghana was apparently due to the fact that even the educated elements showed a great respect for it.en
dc.description.abstractA second reason why chieftaincy survived was that under the customary constitution the people possessed the power to destool their chiefs. If the people felt that their chief had defied their wishes and supported unpopular colonial policies, they would simply destool him. Thus, fearing destoolment, the chiefs avoided close identification with or integration into the colonial system.en
dc.description.abstractFinally, some credit must also be given to the chiefs themselves in preserving the dignity and prestige of chieftaincy. First, some of the chiefs tried to accommodate themselves with educational and social changes by seeking to educate themselves and their heir-apparents. Secondly, some of the chiefs were very prominent in the leadership of the nationalist movement.en
dc.description.abstractBesides investigating the role of the educated Africans, an attempt has been made in this study to throw new light on the role of the rural people in the development of Ghanaian nationalism. It has been argued that the rural people had a long and impressive record of anti-colonial protest. What Nkrumah did was to exploit this discontent and dissatis¬ faction among the rural people and use it for his cause.en
dc.description.abstractFinally, the study has explained and demonstrated that Africans* anti-colonial protest, which took different forms, ranging from passive resistance to "disturbances" and "riots", was organised, forceful and above all successful. As a result, Indirect Rule policies such as the Provincial Councils system, the Native Administration Ordinance, direct taxation, the stool treasuries system, etc., were seriously challenged and frustrated. In short, as a result of this African anti-colonial protest, the classic application of Indirect Rule of the type developed by Lugard in Northern Nigeria was never successfully applied in the Gold Coast Colony.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 18en
dc.titleReactions and attitudes of Africans in Southern Ghana to the British colonial policy of indirect rule, 1925-1951en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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