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dc.contributor.authorOdinko, Monica Ngozi.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T10:15:10Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T10:15:10Z
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29923
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe thesis analyses the interaction patterns of preschool teachers and the preschoolers during instruction in three subject areas of the curriculum, literacy, numeracy and science in preschool settings in Nigeria. Previous research in classroom dynamics has shown that preschoolers tend to learn better if they are actively engaged through interaction with their teachers However, because these were carried out at primary and secondary school levels of education in Nigeria this research provides a comprehensive examination of how teachers and pupils interact during instruction in pre-primary classrooms in Nigeria.en
dc.description.abstractThe research focused on preschool teachers use of instructional time, direction of interaction (who-to-whom), instructional approaches (teaching methods), classroom contexts (whole-class teaching, small group and one-to-one), use of language during instruction and types of questions, responses and feedbacks during instruction in preschool settings in Nigeria. The study also examined the extent to which significant group differences exist in the prevailing classroom interaction patterns based on grouping factors as class size, and teacher qualification, language of instruction, school location (urban/rural) and school type (public/private).en
dc.description.abstractResearch methods included direct observation techniques, which involved using two observational instruments (Classroom Interaction Sheet, CIS and Ten-Minute Interaction Instrument, TMI) and a video camera to record interaction patterns in 216 lessons during the teaching of literacy, numeracy and science. This produced two types of data (qualitative and quantitative). Data analysis involved the use of frequency counts, percentages, Chi-square, transcription and graphical/pictorial illustrations. This gave rise to two types of results - qualitative and quantitative.en
dc.description.abstractResults reveal that Teacher whole-class activity involving direct teaching occurred very frequently, chorus response occurred more than individual pupil activity, monologue and other distracting behaviours occurred less frequently. The direction of communication was mainly from the teacher to the whole class. The more personal oneto-one communication between teacher and pupil occurred less frequently. The teachers, irrespective of their location and type, spent a larger proportion of their lesson time interacting with pupils in large groups than in small groups. The major language of instruction was English language not the language of the pupils' immediate community as was prescribed by the Federal Government of Nigeria (FME, 2004). The use of instructional time and direction of interaction tend to be sensitive to language of instruction. Teacher-initiated interactions and whole class activities are associated more with the use of English as language of instruction while learner-initiated interactions and individual/small group activities are associated more with use of language of the pupils' immediate community during instructional delivery.en
dc.description.abstractThe study concluded by discussing the implications of these findings with a view to improving the following aspects of pre-school education in Nigeria: curriculum planning, classroom practice, teacher training and in-service programmes.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 18en
dc.titleEvaluation of classroom interaction patterns at the pre-primary level of education in Nigeriaen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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