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dc.contributor.authorMatthew, Caroline Zoeen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T10:14:24Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T10:14:24Z
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29872
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractGlossina spp. harbour three symbiotic bacteria: Wigglesworthia glossinidia, on which the fly depends for the production of essential B vitamins; Wolbachia spp., which may be involved in causing reproductive anomalies and Sodalis glossinidius, which as yet has not been shown to have any positive input on the fly but may be involved in susceptibility to trypanosome infection. The current work focuses on the biological and molecular aspects of S. glossinidius but also examines the prevalence of Wolbachia spp. in wild tsetse populationsen
dc.description.abstractOne of the current theories is that the number of S. glossinidius present when the tsetse takes its first blood meal may be an important factor in determining susceptibility to infection. Therefore, the quantification of the number of S.glossinidius bacteria present in tsetse may provide an insight into this mechanism. Utilising quantitative PCR, the levels ofS. glossinidius were quantified and it was found that the bacterial population size is dynamic over the developmental course of the fly.en
dc.description.abstractS. glossinidius is one of the few insect symbionts that can be cultured in vitro. The in vitro culture of this bacterium has been optimised in this work, reducing the time taken for isolation of S. glossinidius by seven days. The growth pattern of S. glossinidius was measured and used to evaluate the effect of stress conditions on the bacterium. It was found that iron was an essential nutrient for the growth of this bacterium and the growth of S. glossinidius was found to be inhibited in irondeficient medium. S. glossinidius was also found to synthesise siderophores in response to these growth conditions.en
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence ofS. glossinidius was analysed in wild flies, with significant differences being found both between different tsetse species and between individual species sampled from different countries. Laboratory colonies, however, exhibit S. glossinidius prevalences of 100% which this work has shown may be due to the horizontal transmission through urophagous behaviour during blood meals. The prevalence of Wolbachia spp. was seen to change over time, with the infection sweeping into one population sampled. This may suggest that Wolbachia spp. causes reproductive abnormalities in the tsetse as it is known to do in other insects.en
dc.description.abstractIt is concluded that the horizontal transmission of S. glossinidius is likely to account for the ubiquity of this symbiont in laboratory colonies of tsetse and may have adversely influenced the studies performed to date on this bacterium.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 18en
dc.titleBiological and molecular aspects of Sodalis glossinidiusen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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