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dc.contributor.advisorNorthcott, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorO'Donovan, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Byron Glen
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-18T10:56:02Z
dc.date.available2018-04-18T10:56:02Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29597
dc.description.abstractThe recent rapid warming of the planet, driven overwhelmingly by human emissions and activities, represents a novel and dire threat to both human and natural systems. It also constitutes an unprecedented global injustice, with those facing the first and, in many cases, the worst impacts being least responsible for causing the problem: the global poor, other species and future generations. Awakening to such a threat also presents a challenge for ethical deliberation, through provoking deep emotional responses that disturb settled identities. In view of all this, the task of ethical deliberation is urgently required. Yet it is itself vulnerable to being derailed by a variety of coping mechanisms that operate to keep the true scale of the problem below the level of our full attention and prevent the necessary frank assessment of what may be required of us. These largely unconscious protective strategies also open the door to those very emotions being exploited by the cultural, economic and political forces primarily responsible for the crisis in the first place. Hence, superficial and inadequate responses proliferate while many feel paralysed into inaction. In the face of this threat to thought, this project seeks to articulate an identity and stance based on Christian theological resources that opens up new space for ethical deliberation in the face of climate fears. Instead of being paralysed by such fears, this thesis argues that fear can instead illuminate and motivate when it is resituated in the service of love through solidarity with the suffering Christ, the poor and with the whole community of creation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionSmith, Byron. Vile Bodies: Nietzsche, Christianity and the Body in Kategoria 22-23 (2001).en
dc.relation.hasversionSmith, Byron, “The Humanity of Godliness: Spirituality and Creatureliness in Rowan Williams”. Pages 115-40 in On Rowan Williams: Critical Essays. Edited by Matheson Russell. Eugene: Cascade, 2009.en
dc.relation.hasversionSmith, Byron., “Climate Change”. Pages 162-66 in The Complete Book of Everyday Christianity. Second edition. Edited by Robert Banks and R. Paul Stevens. Singapore: Graceworks, 2011.en
dc.relation.hasversionSmith, Byron., “Doom, Gloom and Empty Tombs: Climate Change and Fear”. Studies in Christian Ethics 24.1 (2011): 77-91.en
dc.relation.hasversionSmith, Byron., “Green Future: Theology and the Future of the Earth”. Pages 231-46 in Theology and the Future: Evangelical Assertions and Explorations. Edited by Trevor Cairney and David Starling. London: T&T Clark, 2014.en
dc.subjecttheological ethicsen
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectemotionsen
dc.subjectfearen
dc.titleWaking up to a warming world: prospects for Christian ethical deliberation amidst climate fearsen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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