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dc.contributor.authorStrauch, Christina Arjaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-29T12:20:30Z
dc.date.available2018-03-29T12:20:30Z
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29384
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe Observant Franciscan Order was the last religious order with late-medieval origins to found houses in Scotland before the Reformation. Most likely invited to come to Scotland in the 1450s by Mary of Gueldres, the Dutch wife of James II of Scotland, they were to found nine houses by the first decade of the sixteenth century. The first group of Observants in Scotland came from the Dutch dependencies of the Duke of Burgundy, who at the time was Philip the Good, uncle of Mary of Gueldres. Yet as much as the fortunes of the Scottish Observants reflected the experience of the order elsewhere in Europe, especially that of the Observant Franciscan Province of Cologne, to which the Scottish Observants belonged, the Scottish situation was also quite distinct. Unlike elsewhere in Europe, the Observants in Scotland never supplanted their Conventual brethren. In addition there is some evidence that the two branches of the Franciscan Order in Scotland were in competition with each other: there were no attempts by their respective Scottish patrons to reform any of the existing Conventual houses to the Observance. In fact there is some indication that in Scotland the two orders tended to share patrons. It is also very striking that no Scottish Observant house was founded in a burgh with an already established Conventual house - though it should be remembered that while the Observants managed to found nine houses in the later fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, only three of the sixteen Conventual houses were founded in that same period - after a hiatus of more than a century.en
dc.description.abstractThe Observants settled in Edinburgh, St Andrews, Aberdeen, Glasgow, Ayr, Elgin, Stirling, Perth and Jedburgh, which put them in six royal burghs and two important ecclesiastical burghs as well as all three of the Scottish pre-Reformation University centres -although the foundation in Aberdeen pre-dates that of the university there. With the exception of Glasgow and Ayr these were all east coast burghs, most of which had well-established trade links with the Low Countries, Flanders and Northern Germany. Traditionally it has always been assumed that the Observants occupied an influential role at court - they supplied confessors to two successive kings of Scots, James IV and V - but at the same time, this influence appears to be tied to certain locations, not necessarily the order as a whole in Scotland. An investigation into patterns of royal patronage suggests that it was most prominent in those royal burghs where the Observant house had most likely been a royal foundation, while it was markedly less consistent for foundations undertaken either by ecclesiastical or burghal influenceen
dc.description.abstractOverall, the thesis aims to shed some light on the role played by the Observants in later-medieval Scotland; how they were perceived by their contemporaries; and what actual influence they had both at court and within the burgh community. In so doing, it also aims to dispel some of the myths that surround them: myths very often based on conjecture due to a dearth of primary sources, which often put the Observants in a better light than they might have deserved. At the same time, recent historiography has shed light on some aspects of the Observants' experience in pre-Reformation Scotland within the framework of other studies, but hardly any attempts have been made so far to link these different strands of scholarship into one comprehensive study of the Observant Franciscan order in Scotland up to the Reformation.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 17en
dc.titleApostolic poverty at the ends of the Earth: the observant Franciscans in Scotland, c.1457-1560en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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