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dc.contributor.advisorMcIntosh, Rob
dc.contributor.authorBienkiewicz, Marta
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-22T13:35:19Z
dc.date.available2009-07-22T13:35:19Z
dc.date.issued2008-08-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/2850
dc.description.abstractMotor imagery was proven to excite the motor cortex as actual action execution. Therefore, motor imagery training was suggested as a method of facilitating the rehabilitation of the paretic limbs following stroke. Objective. To investigate whether motor imagery brings objectively measurable effects on the motor behaviour, and whether these effects can be enhanced by the application of the mirror technique. Three experiments were conducted involving 32 neurologically healthy participants, with strong right-handedness. Motor imagery simulation of the bimanual movement induced similar changes in terms of temporal precision as overt motor execution. The mid-sagittal mirror technique increased the subjective kinaesthetic and visual vividness of the motor imagery. The source of the observed changes in motor parameters under motor imagery conditions was identified to be different during bimanual conditions. Further investigations need to be conducted to examine the mechanisms underlying observed patterns of results.en
dc.format.extent819639 bytes
dc.format.extent79209 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectcontinuation paradigmen
dc.subjectmotor imagery trainingen
dc.subjectstroke rehabilitationen
dc.subjectspatial couplingen
dc.subjecttemporal couplingen
dc.subjectmid-sagittal mirroren
dc.titleThe reality of virtual limbs: does mirror technique for hand has functional consequences for the motor output?en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.relation.referencesJeannerod, M. (1995). Mental imagery in the motor contex. Neuropsychologia, 33 (11), 1419-1432.en
dc.relation.referencesJohnson-Frey, S. H. (2004). Stimulation through simulation? Motor imagery and functional reorganization in hemiplegic stroke patients. Brain and Cognition, 55, 328-331.en
dc.relation.referencesFranz, E.A. and Ramachandran, V.S.(1998). Bimanual coupling in amputees with phantom limbs. Nature Neuroscience, 1 (6) , 443-444.en
dc.relation.referencesohnson-Frey, S. H. (2004). Stimulation through simulation? Motor imagery and functional reorganization in hemiplegic stroke patients. Brain and Cognition, 55, 328-331.en
dc.relation.referencesHelmuth, L. L., & Ivry, R. B. (1996) When Two Hands Are Better Than One: Reduced Timing Variability During Bimanual Movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 22 (2), 278-293.en
dc.relation.referencesFranz, E. A. (2003). Bimanual actions representation: A window in human evolution. In S. H. Johnson-Frey (Ed.), Taking action: cognitive neuroscience perspectives on intentional acts (pp. 259 – 288). Cambridge: The MIT Press.en
dc.relation.referencesSabaté, M., González, B., & Rodriguez, M. (2004) Brain lateralization of motor imagery: motor planning asymmetry as a cause of movement lateralization. Neuropsychologia, 42, 1041-1049.en
dc.type.qualificationlevelMastersen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc Master of Scienceen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


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