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dc.contributor.authorLewis, George Herberten
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:47:01Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:47:01Z
dc.date.issued1903en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/28428
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIt is a matter of common observation in the world at large that new ideas political, ethical and religious occasionally arise, one hardly knows how, and become for the time being, the dominating question, interesting nearly the whole of civilised humanity. Numbers of books are written on such questions; acrid controversies very often arise; and finally the idea is either accepted and becomes a recognised part of the common stock of human thought, or is rejected and sinks back into the limbo whence it arose.en
dc.description.abstractIn the Medical Polity the same phenomena take place on a smaller scale. The unknown cause of a disease is said to be discovered, or a new remedy is devised for some hitherto incurable malady. Protagonists and antagonists hasten to the combat. The air rings with recriminations and the shouts of triumph. The question occupies a place of paramount importance in the medical journals. Even the lay press deigns to give the ever sanguine public some scraps of information, too often incorrect. If it be a new treatment, the results are lauded to the skies. Intemperate writers hasten to announce that death has lost its terrors, that 70, 80 or 90% of those afflicted with some virulent disease are cured and cured easily, even in the most advanced stages (cf. Nineteenth Century, March 1899) and then comes the inevitable reaction. The intemperate prophets are shown to have drawn brilliant pictures at the expense of the truth and gloomy seers are received with favour, who announce that the new treatment is no better than the old, but perhaps, if anything, worse. Finally, after much futile and unnecessary controversy, the results of the treatment are established on the basis of common sense, statistics, and extended observation.en
dc.description.abstractIt is no exaggeration to say that the subject of the open air treatment of phthisis about which this Thesis is concerned, has been, and is indeed even now to a certain extent, passing through these phases.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 16en
dc.titleThe open-air treatment of chronic pulmonary tuberculosis as applied to general hospitals: with special reference to the results obtained at Northampton General Hospitalen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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