Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGupta, Sujataen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:44:57Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:44:57Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/28170
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe highly successful Hot Big Bang model, first hypothesised by Gamow in the 1940s, and supported by observations of an expanding Universe and by Big Bang nucleosynthesis, has been the standard cosmological model since the discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation by Penzias and Wilson in 1964. There are, however, some crucial gaps in our understanding of the nature of the Universe. The Hot Big Bang model does not predict perturbations in the matter distribution of our Universe. The origin of the large scale structure, such as planets, stars and galaxies is not known. Further, we do not know how big the Universe is, how old, or what its main constituents are. There are a group of early Universe models which predict primordial fluctuations in the Universe, and using the most popular of these, ‘inflation’, the preliminary results of precision cosmology are giving the first glimpses of values for these mysterious quantities.en
dc.description.abstractThe cosmic microwave background radiation gives us a ‘snapshot’ of the very early Universe, an invaluable source of cosmological information. The Microwave Anisotropy probe (M A P) and the Planck Surveyor satellite will provide a map of the distribution of the cosmic microwave background over the sky, with a resolution approximately two orders of magnitude better than the previous satellite with a similar goal, which was the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite (CO BE), launched in the late 1980s.en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this thesis is to compare and contrast the predictions of early Universe models with respect to their predictions of the distribution of the cosmic microwave background radiation, as well as to garner information about cosmological parameters from the upcoming data. I approach this in three ways. The first goal is to develop statistical tools to detect non-Gaussianity in the cosmic microwave background, which would change the interpretation of the early Universe model. A significant detection of non-Gaussianity would conflict with the predictions of the simplest inflation model. The second aim is to develop very rapid cosmological parameter estimation methods, should inflation be supported by the tests of Gaussianity, and the third to develop predictions for the cosmic microwave background for the warm inflation model.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 16en
dc.titleTests and predictions of the cosmic microwave backgrounden
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record