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dc.contributor.authorDickson, Thomas Elderen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:42:34Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:42:34Z
dc.date.issued1937en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/27908
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractFew artists have the hardihood to set up as psychologists. it is meet, therefore, that I should preface these studies with an apology. The conspicuous failure of attempts by artists to write psychology requires no recalling. This fact might well have been a salutary warning against entering so specialised a province as that of aesthetics. But the desire to comprehend those secret processes by which I have, to some extent, been able to achieve my artistic aims has always been strong and at times imperious. It was not, therefore, any undue confidence in my ability to prosecute these investigations or any self - assurance that I could bring new light to bear on so vast and so difficult a problem that prompted the undertaking, but a keen desire to satisfy a clamant personal need.en
dc.description.abstractThere was perhaps another motive present in my mind besides mere curiosity as to the nature of my own psychological processes: the desire to compare representative views and theories with my own experience as a producing artist, and to observe the extent to which they appeared to confirm or disprove my own speculations and introspective results. Throughout I have aimed at accuracy rather than novelty, facts rather than originality. I have tried not to obtrude unduly my own theoretical predilections, but rather to examine such doctrines as have come up for discussion in the double light of my own creative experience and the accredited facts of psychology. To what extent I have been successful in these pursuits the following studies will presently bear witness.en
dc.description.abstractThe work has undergone many modifications since its inception. Originally the plan included the study of the appreciative as well as the productive aspect of art. 13ut circumstances early led to the curtailment of its scope: first, the realisation that the task was impossible because of its immensity; and second, prolonged periods of illness between the years 1930 and 1933 which forced we to reduce my activities to essential duties. Perhaps the curtailment of the field has not been without some compensatory virtue; for I have been able to concentrate on one aspect and that, one in which I am naturally chiefly interested. The appreciation of art has to a limited degree been dealt with in an Appendix, where the problem has been approached from a pedagogical standpoint. I have also added an Appendix dealing with representation in art - this, too, from the pedagogic point of view. :Both appendices, I hope, will clear up minor difficulties which could not conveniently be discussed in the main text without involving some divagation.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 16en
dc.titlePsychological studies of art: with special reference to pictorial arten
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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