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dc.contributor.authorWright, George Gibson Neillen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:40:39Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:40:39Z
dc.date.issued1933en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/27711
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIt is an unfortunate result of the semi - practical aims which naturally influence social philosophers, that they are apt throughout to take up an indifferent, if not a hostile, attitude to their given object. They hardly believe in actual society as a botanist believes in plants, or a biologist in vital processes. And hence, social theory comes off badly. No student can really appreciate an object for which he is always apologising... It is in no spirit of obscurantism ... that some t.ke up a different position. They are convinced that an actual living society is an infinitely higher creature than a steam -engine, a plant, or an animal; and that the best of their ideas are not too good to be employed in analysing it.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 16en
dc.titlePsychological analysis of social structureen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelen
dc.type.qualificationnameDLitt Doctor of Literatureen


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