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dc.contributor.authorSims, F. H.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:37:35Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:37:35Z
dc.date.issued1950en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/27400
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractBiochemical and histological studies were undertaken of non -pregnant and pregnant rats maintained on diets substantially free from methionine and choline. The results of these investigations were applied to the interpretation of measurements made on the blood and urine of normal and toxaemic pregnant 'omen, and were used in the study of the histological sections of the tissues of a number of maternal deaths.en
dc.description.abstractThe following conclusions were reached:en
dc.description.abstract(1) For the rat, a severe deprivation of choline and methionine produces a diminished excre-Lion of these substances but does not alter the composition of the blood or the tissues of the body, except for a reduction of the plasma protein concentration.en
dc.description.abstract(2) Such a depletion produces significant histological changes only in the liver, kidney, and the mammary tissue of the pregnant animal, and of these, the liver changes are the most prominent. They consist of a variable admixture of fatty degeneration, and rarefaction of the cytoplasm of the liver cells, and are the most sensitive index of this specific depletion; they exist when no other pathological changes can be found.en
dc.description.abstract(3) Lactation in the rat is inhibited in the absence of adequate supplies of choline and methionine, and it is probable that methionine is the important factor.en
dc.description.abstract(4) In humans, a raised choline and methionine excretion not correlated with toxaemic manifestations, was found in the pregnant state, and is regarded as further evidence of defective re-absorption by the renal tubules at this time.en
dc.description.abstract(5) Liver sections from seven normal pregnant women and five toxaemic pregnant women show no evidence of fatty change and it is therefore unlikely thati a shortage of choline is an important feature of eclampsia. Changes in the liver cells which are present in eclamptics, but not present in the liver sectiions of normal pregnant women, however, suggest that a general protein depletion may well play an important part in precipitating the development of this condition.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 16en
dc.titleA study of the pathological changes associated with a deficiency of choline and methionine, and some observations on the metabolism of these substances in normal and pathological pregnancyen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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