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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Roberten
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:37:29Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:37:29Z
dc.date.issued1957en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/27390
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIn modern obstetric practice the aim of the accoucheur is to obtain a vaginal delivery where possible, but only if this object can be reached without injury to mother or child. Because of this attempt to obtain delivery per vias naturalis the maternal pelvis has been the subject of close study by obstetricians for many years. Attempts to measure the pelvis in the living subject has resulted in many varieties of pelvimeter and manual methods of measurement, but it was not until the improvement in X -ray technique that an accurate study of the pelvic architecture was Possible and reliable measurements made.en
dc.description.abstractA large bibliography has accumulated on the study of radiological technique in the pregnant woman, both in this country, Europe and America, and some of these papers will be referred to later. On studying the published series, especially from Britain, it was apparent that there was a consider able variation in the results, and it seemed to me that it would be worth studying the problem in this area, i.e. the South -East of Scotland. I considered that by obtaining a fairly large series of cases and correlating this with various findings such as maternal height, baby weight and duration of labour, one would have a basis on which to assess future cases in our own hospital.en
dc.description.abstractAnother valuable contribution that X -ray pelvimetry makes possible to us in this region in which all the maternity hospitals are congregated in a small area, is to be able to assess a case that may be delivered elsewhere. Many cases are delivered in Cottage hospitals or at home, often at a distance of 50 miles from the main centres, and one is frequently sent cases by their general practitioner with a request to ascertain whether labour will be normal or not. While I do not underestimate the value of abdominal and vaginal examination with an estimate of cephalo- pelvic disproportion, the fact remains that in many women there is pelvic contraction at a lower level than the brim of the pelvis, and this may be difficult to assess antenatally in some patients. Nowadays many general practitioners are unwilling to under - take any operative delivery themselves, even a low forceps, and they expect an obstetric opinion to eliminate these when possible. 'Even in a good home a forceps delivery is often undesirable,and this point was brought out by Aitken (1955) speaking on behalf of the general practitioners of South Lincolnshire at the British Congress of Obstetrics at Oxford.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 16en
dc.titleA study of the female pelvis in normal and abnormal deliveryen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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