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dc.contributor.authorRoss, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-25T13:20:27Z
dc.date.available2018-01-25T13:20:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/26033
dc.description.abstractIn my field, astrophysics, and in my subfield of observational extragalactic astronomy, we are blessed by the fact that our research data sources are generally static (i.e. version controlled), well documented databases that can be easily queried with e.g. SQL. In this regard, astrophysics can be thought of in many ways as leading in scientific research when it comes to “open research data”, and the amount of new articles in the literature that are new discoveries not envisaged by the original data creators, now (easily) outnumber those using more ‘traditional’ research techniques. However, there are still many issues. First is the Reproducibility Problem, which for contemporary astrophysics should be a solved problem, but isn’t. Second, there is the idea of the “Proprietary Period” where data can be help privately for a given time with legitimate motivation, but sometimes negative scientific outcomes. Finally there is the issue of Early Career Researchers and the danger, apparent or real, of “getting scooped” in an open data environment. In this talk, I will examine a couple of case examples in modern astrophysics research where open research data has quietly, but surely revolutionized the field (e.g. the Sloan Digital Sky Survey) and where reproducibility, proprietary periods and large collaborations are taking us in the 2020s (e.g. the James Webb Space Telescope, the LSST, Euclid and DESI.). A video of this presentation can be viewed at https://media.ed.ac.uk/media/0_4jewsfn4en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectResearch Dataen
dc.subjectAstrophysicsen
dc.titleCase Studies and a quiet, but very real revolution in Observational Astrophysicsen
dc.typePresentationen


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