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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2512

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Title: Sodium sulfate heptahydrate: a synchrotron energy-dispersive diffraction study of an elusive metastable hydrated salt
Authors: Hamilton, Andrea
Hall, Christopher
Issue Date: 2008
Citation: J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2008, 23, 840–844
Publisher: The Royal Society of Chemistry
Abstract: We describe an unusual application of synchrotron energy-dispersive diffraction with hard X-rays to obtain structural information on metastable sodium sulfate heptahydrate. This hydrate was often mentioned in nineteenth and early twentieth century scientific literature but rarely in modern publications, and it had not been characterised structurally. Using a unique three-detector fixed-angle X-ray geometry, a good quality powder diffraction pattern was obtained directly from a stirred suspension of hydrate crystals in saturated aqueous sodium sulfate solution at about 14 degrees celcius. The suspension of crystals was contained in the 22 mm dia sealed cylindrical bottle in which crystallization occurred. Indexing showed that the heptahydrate has a tetragonal unit cell with a = 7.1668 A and c = 22.2120 A with a few weak unindexed reflections arising from the 2a supercell. New gravimetric data and the cell dimensions confirm the heptahydrate composition originally proposed by Loewel
Keywords: Engineering
Materials science
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/b716734b
http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2512
Appears in Collections:Engineering publications

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