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dc.contributor.advisorDwyer, Cathy
dc.contributor.advisorRutherford, Kenny
dc.contributor.authorMasłowska, Katarzyna
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-22T14:32:15Z
dc.date.available2017-09-22T14:32:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/23582
dc.description.abstractCastration of male lambs is performed in all major sheep producing counties as a standard management practice. The reasons to castrate may be different and will depend on the size and type of the farm. Castration gives more control over genetics of the flock, stops inbreeding, unwanted pregnancies and behaviours. It also gives improved carcass characteristics. However, it has been shown that castration is painful and distressing to the animals. Different techniques are used to castrate sheep at the present time such as rubber ring, Burdizzo, combined, short scrotum, and surgical castration. Due to changing attitudes towards animal pain and unnecessary suffering there is a need for further development and implementation of new castration methods, efficient pain assessment techniques, animal welfare codes of practice and legislative requirements to improve lamb well-being. Recent increase of public concern regarding animal welfare is putting pressure on many government bodies to strengthen research in this area and increase attempts to regulate by law unnecessary suffering during standard livestock management practices. Immunocastration with an anti-GnRF vaccine has the potential to be an alternative to common physical castration methods. Nonetheless there is little or no information about the impact of vaccination against GnRF on the physiology of lambs (rams’ reproductive tract, endocrine regulation), emotionality (possible changes to normal behavioural patterns like increased aggression, anxiety) and health (is the vaccine safe to be used and if there are any adverse effects of vaccination like tissue damage, swelling, lesions etc.). There is also little or no information on how the vaccine affects sheep at the time of injection. This study investigates three main questions: Is Immunocastration a pain free alternative to traditional physical methods of castration? Is Immunocastration safe and practical to use? Does Immunocastration influence the male reproductive system in a way to achieve sterility without any negative impact on the ram natural behaviours, wellbeing and health?en
dc.contributor.sponsorotheren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionK. Masłowska, C.M Dwyer. (2012). The Effect of immunization against gonadotropinreleasing factor (GnRF) on circulating testosterone and the development of sexual behaviour in ram lambs. British Society of Animal Science, Nottingham, United Kingdom, April 2012, p113.en
dc.relation.hasversionK. Masłowska, A. Futro, C.M Dwyer. (2013). Ewes direct more maternal attention toward lambs that express the most severe pain-related responses. 47th ISAE conference, Florianopolis, Brazil, June 2013, p97.en
dc.relation.hasversionK. Masłowska, E Abadin, C.M Dwyer. (2014). Influence of castration method and sex on lamb behaviour, the development of ewe-lamb bonding and stress responses. 48th ISAE conference, Victora-Gaistez, Spain, July-August 2014, p125.en
dc.subjectanimal welfareen
dc.subjectcastrationen
dc.subjectpainen
dc.subjectimmunizationen
dc.subjectanalgesiaen
dc.subjectGnRHen
dc.subjectramsen
dc.titleStudy of an anti-GnRF vaccine as a more welfare friendly method of castration for ram lambsen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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