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dc.contributor.advisorWhiteman, Martha
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Sonja
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-09T14:35:05Z
dc.date.available2008-07-09T14:35:05Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/2327
dc.description.abstractVolunteers fill a large variety of important roles in society, roles which differ substantially depending on the nature of the job. The majority of current literature focuses on the personality traits and motivations that serve to distinguish volunteers as a whole from the general population. Acknowledging this, the present study examines differences within the volunteer population, comparing two volunteer groups with roles deemed either high or low personal risk, on measures of a five factor model of personality, sensation seeking and functional motivation to volunteer. Univariate differences were found between the groups on all three measures. Multivariate analysis showed Emotional Stability, SS-Disinhibition, and the Social, Values and Understanding motivations to be significant predictors of specific volunteer group membership. Results are discussed in relation to the adequacy of using one volunteer function scale to assess the diverse range of volunteer roles and as to the potential fulfilment of sensation seeking arousal through volunteering.en
dc.format.extent189953 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectpersonality traitsen
dc.subjectsensation seekingen
dc.subjectvolunteeringen
dc.subjectpersonal risken
dc.titlePersonality, sensation seeking and motivation differences between high and low risk volunteer groupsen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelUndergraduateen
dc.type.qualificationnameUndergraduateen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


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