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dc.contributor.authorSobhani, Mehrnooshen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-02T08:59:04Z
dc.date.available2017-08-02T08:59:04Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/23198
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines Edgar Reitz's internationally acclaimed films Heimat (1984) and Die Zweite Heimat (1992) in the context of the early avant-garde theories and films which Reitz developed during his years at the Ulm Film Institute. The two films have been widely analysed in articles, essays, books and PhD theses within the context of the Heimat film genre of the 1950s and the anti-Heimat and critical Heimat film genres of the 1960s and 1970s. They have also been extensively debated for their controversial portrayal of the Third Reich and the Holocaust. Astonishingly, in all these studies, critics have assumed that, apart from an autobiographical relationship, there is no link between Reitz's Heimat-films and his early avant-garde theories and films. Interpretations therefore largely overlook the cinematographic issues which the films raise. This dissertation attempts to close this gap in the discussion of Reitz's Heimat-films. Starting with a detailed study of Reitz's early avant-garde theories and films, it investigates his contributions to the New German Cinema, shedding light on his novel approach in exploring a new film language, as well as a new film venue. Critics have debated the question of the venue for Reitz's Heimat-films, which were made for the cinema but became popular through the medium of television. Few, however, have related this debate to Reitz's earlier attempts to challenge the conventional venue of film. The fact that critics have predominantly focused on the question of history and the meaning of Heimat in the two films has had the unfortunate consequence that references to Reitz's earlier films have been restricted to those which likewise deal with the topic of National Socialism, namely Die Reise nach Wien (1973) and Stunde Null (1976). This dissertation begins with an examination of Reitz's rarely discussed essay on a new cinema in "Definitionen" (1963), written a year after the declaration of the New German Cinema. It also examines the revised version of "Definitionen" in "Utopie Kino" (1963-65), and Reitz's collaborative essay with Alexander Kluge and Wilfried Reinke in "Wort und Film" (1965). It explores Reitz's theoretical ideas in his early avant-garde projects, Kommunikation (1961), Geschwindigkeit (1962), VariaVision (1964), Mahlzeiten (1967) and Geschichten vom Kiibelkind (1970). Heimat and Die Zweite Heimat are examined within the context of these early works. This approach leads to the investigation of new themes and meanings in Heimat and Die Zweite Heimat, which in turn question the interpretation of the films as television series, conventional films and a departure from the New German Cinema. For the very first time, this approach calls attention to Reitz's Utopias for a new film language, structure and venue, and presents Heimat and Die Zweite Heimat as his attempts to realise these.
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.subjectAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 11en
dc.titleAvant-garde film or television series. On Edgar Reitz's cinema utopiaen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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