Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorPain, Helen
dc.contributor.advisorGood, Judith
dc.contributor.authorAlcorn, Alyssa Marie
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-17T14:56:02Z
dc.date.available2017-07-17T14:56:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/22862
dc.description.abstractRelative infrequency of communication initiation, particularly initiations that involve attention-sharing or other social purposes, appears to negatively impact the later-life outcomes of children with autism. Strategies to improve or encourage initiation skills in autism are hampered by the need for the behaviour to be spontaneous (i.e. unprompted by a partner). One potential approach that addresses the spontaneity issue is to extrinsically motivate initiations by changing aspects of the child’s environment such that they merit, or even demand, initiating a communication. Detecting subjectively inconsistent (i.e. discrepant) aspects in game-like virtual contexts appears to be something that inherently interests young children with autism, and can motivate them to initiate spontaneous, positive communications. Initial evidence for discrepancy as a communicative motivator came from a study which re-analysed video data from an existing autism and technology project (ECHOES), illustrating that a heterogeneous group of children all reacted frequently and socially to naturally occurring (i.e. unintentional, non-designed) discrepant aspects within ECHOES. A set of high-level design principles was developed in order to capture “lessons learned” from ECHOES that might facilitate re-creation of a similar pattern of spontaneous, positive initiation around discrepancy. A second, proof-of-concept study implemented these design principles in a set of three new touch-screen games (Andy’s Garden) that sought to establish, and then deliberately violate, child expectations (i.e. provide discrepancy-detection opportunities: DDOs). Children reacted socially and positively to the new games and DDOs. The results of this study allow us to answer its overall questions affirmatively: it is possible to motivate children’s communication–specifically, their initiation–by including deliberately-designed DDOs in a set of games. These findings are the first step towards determining whether discrepancy-detection opportunities may form a component of a future technology-based communication skills intervention, capable of changing children’s initiation behaviour outside of a game context.en
dc.contributor.sponsorEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionAlcorn, A., Pain, H., and Good, J. (2013). Discrepancies in a virtual learning environment: something worth communicating about for young children with ASC? In Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, pages 56-65. ACM.en
dc.relation.hasversionAlcorn, A., Pain, H., Rajendran, G., Smith, T., Lemon, O., Porayska-Pomsta, K., Foster, M. E., Avramides, K., Frauenberger, C., and Bernardini, S. (2011). Social communication between virtual characters and children with autism. In Biswas, G., Bull, S., Kay, J., and Mitrovic, A., editors, Artificial Intelligence in Education, volume Lecture No, pages 7-14, Berlin. Springer Verlag.en
dc.relation.hasversionPorayska-Pomsta, K., Frauenberger, C., Pain, H., Rajendran, G., Smith, T., Menzies, R., Foster, M. E., Alcorn, a., Wass, S., Bernadini, S., Avramides, K., Keay-Bright, W., Chen, J., Waller, a., Guldberg, K., Good, J., and Lemon, O. (2011). Developing technology for autism: an interdisciplinary approach. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 16(2):117-127.en
dc.relation.hasversionAlcorn, A., Good, J., and Pain, H. (2013). Deliberate system-side errors as a potential pedagogic strategy for exploratory virtual learning environments. In Lane, H. C., Yacef, K., Mostow, J., and Pavlik, P., editors, 16th International Conference, AIED 2013, Memphis, TN, USA, July 9-13, 2013., pages 483–492. Springer- Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.en
dc.relation.hasversionAlcorn, A., Pain, H., Good, J., and Rajendran, G. (2012). Surprising Events in a Virtual Environment: A Catalyst for the Initiation of Spontaneous Social Interactions by Children with ASC. Poster presentation and demonstration. In International Meeting for Autism Research technology demonstration session, Toronto, CA., Toronto, Canada. International Meeting for Autism Research.en
dc.relation.hasversionAlcorn, A. M., Pain, H., and Good, J. (2014). Motivating children’s initiations with novelty and surprise: initial design recommendations for autism. In Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Interaction design and children, pages 225–228, Aarhus, Denmark. ACM.en
dc.relation.hasversionFrauenberger, C., Good, J., Alcorn, A., and Pain, H. (2013). Conversing through and about technologies: Design critique as an opportunity to engage children with autism and broaden research(er) perspectives. International Journal of Child- Computer Interaction, 1(2):38–49.en
dc.relation.hasversionFrauenberger, C., Good, J., Alcorn, A., and Pain, H. (2012). Supporting the design contributions of children with autism spectrum conditions. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children - IDC ’12, page 134.en
dc.subjectautismen
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjectHCIen
dc.subjectdesignen
dc.subjectassistive technologyen
dc.titleEmbedding novel and surprising elements in touch-screen games for children with autism: creating experiences “worth communicating about”en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record