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dc.contributor.authorNudds, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-22T14:43:26Z
dc.date.available2007-06-22T14:43:26Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Philosophy 9:2, p.210-229.en
dc.identifier.issn0966-8373
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/1776
dc.description.abstractWhether or not we would be happy to do without sounds, the idea that our experience of sounds is of things which are distinct from the world of material objects can seem compelling. All you have to do is close your eyes and reflect on the character of your auditory experience. In what follows I will describe the features of our auditory experience which can lead one to think of sounds in this way. I will then describe a way in which we can experience sounds to be part of the material world. Since this is a kind experience that essentially involves more than one sense, I will end by drawing some conclusions about how we should think about the senses.en
dc.format.extent156079 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwells Publishers Ltden
dc.subjectphilosophyen
dc.titleExperiencing the Production of Soundsen
dc.typeArticleen


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