Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBanas, Kasia
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Laura
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorKane, Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-17T14:09:08Z
dc.date.available2016-08-17T14:09:08Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/16108
dc.description.abstract121 participants completed measures assessing their emotional response and behavioural intentions towards a video clip portraying an individual with autism. Four conditions were used to examine how age of target individual shown in the clip (child or adult) and the provision of information (informed or uninformed) influenced attitudes. Additionally participants’ knowledge of autism, autistic tendencies and exposure to autism were also measured. In the absence of literature on the different attitudes expressed towards adults and children with autism, the study revealed adults were more positively viewed than children with autism, but there was no effect of providing information of an autism diagnosis. Interestingly, results indicated that the more autistic tendencies a participant had the less sympathy and helping but greater fear they expressed towards the autistic individual. The practical implications of these novel findings are discussed, with particular focus on the impact of our findings on the different attitudes elicited for adults and children with autism.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen_US
dc.subjectstigmaen_US
dc.subjectautismen_US
dc.titleThe Public Perception of Autism.en_US
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelUndergraduateen_US
dc.type.qualificationnameUndergraduateen_US
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record