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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/1397

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Title: Playing the Ethnic Card - politics and ghettoisation in London’s East End
Authors: Glynn, Sarah
Issue Date: Aug-2006
Citation: Sarah Glynn (2006) PLAYING THE ETHNIC CARD – politics and ghettoisation in London’s East End, online papers archived by the Institute of Geography, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.
Publisher: Institute of Geography. The School of Geosciences.The University of Edinburgh
Series/Report no.: Institute of Geography Online Paper Series;GEO-018
Abstract: Ghettoisation is a politically charged subject, and politicians are often accused of encouraging racism and ghettoisation by ‘playing the race card’. But it is not just political parties that may be found to be promoting ethnic separation. There are strong drives towards separate organisation within different ethnic communities, and organisational separation can easily manifest itself as physical separation; indeed sometimes that is an important aim. This paper explores the role of political forces on the evolution and development of ghettoisation through the example of one of the most ghettoised immigrant communities in Britain, the Bengali Muslims in Tower Hamlets, whose families largely immigrated from Sylhet in what is now Bangladesh.
Keywords: Tower Hamlets
East London
Bengali muslim
community
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/1397
Appears in Collections:Institute of Geography Online Papers Series

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