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dc.contributor.authorKetland, Jeffrey
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-13T16:19:47Z
dc.date.available2006-07-13T16:19:47Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationAnalysis 63/4, 292-297.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/1341
dc.description.abstractTarski’s Indefinability Theorem can be generalized so that it applies to many-valued languages. We introduce a notion of strong semantic self-representation applicable to any (sufficiently rich) interpreted many-valued language L. A sufficiently rich interpreted many-valued language L is SSSR just in case it has a function symbol n(x) such that, for any f Sent(L), the denotation of the term n(“f”) in L is precisely ||f||L, the semantic value of f in L. By a simple diagonal construction (finding a sentence l such that l is equivalent to n(“l”) T), it is shown that no such language strongly represents itself semantically. Hence, no such language can be its own metalanguage.en
dc.format.extent91143 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBlackwellsen
dc.subjectphilosophyen
dc.subjectphilosophy of mathematicsen
dc.titleCan a Many-Valued Language Functionally Represent its own Semantics?en
dc.typeArticleen


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