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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/1301

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Title: Doing Without Representing?
Authors: Clark, Andy
Toribio, Josefa
Issue Date: 1994
Citation: "Doing Without Representing?" Synthese 101:1994 401-431
Publisher: Springer
Abstract: Connectionism and classicism, it appears, have at least this much in common: both place some notion of internal representation at the heart of a scientific study of mind. In recent years, however, a much more radical view has gained increasing popularily. This view calls into question the commitment to internal representation itself. more strikingly still, this new wave of anti-representationalism is rooted not in 'armchair' theorizing but in practical attempts to model and understand intelligent, adaptive behaviour. In this paper we first present, and then critically assess, a variety of recent anti-representationalist treatments. We suggest that so far, at least, the sceptical rhetoric outpaces both evidence and argument. Some probable causes of this premature scepticism are isolated. nonetheless, the anti-representationalist challenge is shown to be both important and progressive insofar as it forces us to see beyond the bare representational/ non-represenational dichotomy and to recognize instead a rich continuum of degrees and types of represenatationality.
Keywords: philosophy
anti-representationalism
internal representation
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/1301
Appears in Collections:Philosophy research publications

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