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dc.contributor.authorGordon, John Donald Munro
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-17T15:29:48Z
dc.date.available2015-12-17T15:29:48Z
dc.date.issued1969
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/12254
dc.description.abstractIn 1897 Davenport measured the wet and dry weights of amphibian embryos from the stage of hatching onwards. He observed that there was a continuous increase in the wet weight but that the dry weight remained constant until the embryo began feeding. From this he concluded that "growth is due chiefly to imbibed water". Schaper (1902) noted a similar constancy of dry weight from the early tail bud stages until the time of feeding in embryos of Rana fusca. These early observations have been confirmed by Dempster (1933) who, working with Amblystoma punctatwn, extended his experiments to include the earliest developmental stages. The increase in volume, and hence the growth, of amphibian embryos is therefore due to the uptake of water from the environment. Many embryologists have attempted to correlate this water uptake with the osmotic pressure of the embryos. The early work in this field has been extensively reviewed by Needham (1931).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectOsmotic pressureen
dc.subjectXenopus laevisen
dc.subjectEmbryologyen
dc.titleForces involved in regulating the uptake of water into the blastocoel and archenteron of Xenopus laevis embryosen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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